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Gardening by numbers

Gardening by numbers

Square-foot gardening has been around for decades, but is it right for your place?
Happy when it’s wet

Happy when it’s wet

Do you have a bog garden, a damp garden area or a streamside in need of planting?
A micro lesson

A micro lesson

Daily nutrients and vitamins can be found in microgreens, but it is sometimes the motivation that is lacking.
Gardening 101 - July

Gardening 101 - July

How-to for beginner gardeners with Shannon Hunt.

Past Articles

Colourful upcycled bird feeders

Colourful upcycled bird feeders

With winter an especially tough time for birds to find naturally occurring food, these bird feeders will be a real treat.
The fruits of winter

The fruits of winter

Your guide to the dos and do nots for the season ahead.
A cut above

A cut above

It’s time to give those roses a long hard stare with loppers in hand. Here is a quick guide to make sure you make the right cut.
Holla!  Hoya!

Holla! Hoya!

Far from fusty, hoyas don’t ask for much – but they deliver in spades.

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Kiwi Gardener

Kiwi Gardener

"The magazine for gardeners who like to get their hands dirty!"
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One word - thriving!

One word - thriving!Huge Golden cane $250 ... See MoreSee Less

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Wow awesome 👌

beautiful!

Absolutely stunning ❣

What a beauty

Makayla Steer

Omg 🥰 Arai Wilson

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Have you seen our Winter quarterly on shelves?

Its the thrifty gardeners guide to propagating! 😄

Have you seen our Winter quarterly on shelves?

It's the thrifty gardener's guide to propagating! 😄
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Chris Carlile-Smith

Jeremiah DMc

Kerrie Bloomfield

Holly did you see this?

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Want to win a box of compostable cling wrap to try for yourself?

Thanks to Ecobags & Ecopack you can get your hands on a product that performs similarly to traditional plastic cling film, with the advantage of being 100% home compostable. 

To be in to win, simply comment below one piece of gardening advice that has been passed down (either by a family member or a friend) that youd like to share with the Kiwi Gardener community!

We are all about sharing gardening advice and trying to be eco-friendly where possible. 🙌

12 winners will be drawn this Friday 23 July at 10am and contacted directly. Open to NZ residents only.

Now closed!
Want to win a box of compostable cling wrap to try for yourself?

Thanks to Ecobags & Ecopack you can get your hands on a product that performs similarly to traditional plastic cling film, with the advantage of being 100% home compostable.

To be in to win, simply comment below one piece of gardening advice that has been passed down (either by a family member or a friend) that you'd like to share with the Kiwi Gardener community!

We are all about sharing gardening advice and trying to be eco-friendly where possible. 🙌

12 winners will be drawn this Friday 23 July at 10am and contacted directly. Open to NZ residents only.
... See MoreSee Less

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When you pick rhubarb cut the leaves off where you stand and use them as ground cover on your rhubarb patch. When they break down the rhubarb gets back the same nutrients it needs to grow.

My grandfather taught me to always clean your garden tools. By rinsing your tools with water and getting rid of leftover dirt, you will prevent spreading diseases, fungi, insect eggs and weeds around your garden. Cleaning will also help keep the rust from eating into the tools.

When growing potatoes in your trench put some fresh grass clippings in the base and plant your seed potatoes on top. When harvesting time comes you'll have clean new potatoes. Wonderful advice from an elderly lady I used to mow her lawns and care for her vegetable garden.

My grandfather used to thread single strand of copper wire through the stalk of tomato plants never had any blight or bugs and beautiful tomatoes (it still works today as I believe in no spray gardening)

My nana was a great gardener, she used watered down urine, which she put on her hydrangas and they were beautiful, i grow orchids my hint is put cold water off boiled rice in yr plants.

Water your garden in the evening ... to avoid evaporation and allow plants to have a good overnight soak ... my Dad was an automated irrigation designer and installer

a wise old friend advised me of no dig technique for farming and gardening. so good Andrew Sandison

Trees like wood chip mulch (helps good fungus) , veges prefer compost (bacteria). Good rule of thumb.

My Dad had a beautiful vegetable garden. Always buried the vegetable waste straight into the garden.

My old neighbour Joan was instrumental in my gardening journey. She told me after I regaled her with yet another seed starting horror story, "Just try again". Three little words that kept me going. So the day I went to visit her with 2 almost forearm sized carrots, she dramatically threw her hands up in the air and said "well I might as well give up trying". She's been gone 6 and a half years now and that memory still brings tears to my eyes. So the advice I will always give now is just try again.

Identify the type of grass you have. There are many different varieties and if you ever want to replace some of it in the future its best to know which type it is, so you can match it. (Wisdom from my grandad-I always thought grass was grass :-) )

Bury banana skins under roses for Extra blooms and citrus love them too 💚

Bury bits of broken up banana skins when planting shrubs and flowers for extra potassium 💛🍌

Make your own compost, your garden will have lots of blooms and your harvest of vegetables will be great, no need to buy from the supermarket

Get your soul tested when starting out digging a vege garden. It will tell you how acidic your soil is and what you might need to put in eg compost to increase the nutrient levels

My nana was such a pro gardener (in my eyes) and had a beautiful garden! She always said... if a plant doesn't survive, try again, and if still doesn't survive then it just wasn't meant to be there... Haha coming from her, it always made me feel better anyways when a plant didn't thrive well hehe

My late father mulched the rhubarb with lawn clipping, we had lovely thick stalks of rhubarb

Use watered down sheep pellets. These work great on most plants and tree. Manure is very important for a good garden

Seaweed for the garden and banana skins for the roses.

When planting Strawberries, paint some pebbles red and place them around the strawberry plants before the strawberries fruit and birds will peck the hard pebbles then leave the strawberries by the time they're fruiting.

When planting tomato seedlings put a good handful of powdered milk in hole, place plant on top and fill hole in. The calcium in milk will help stop blossom end rot.

When you've got a rather daunting gardening job, just tackle one 2m by 2m section at a time.

Dig used coffee grounds and tea leaves into your soil for a great nutrient boost

Plant broad beans on Anzac day , and sweet peas on March 30th to have early crops .

Always enjoy the flowers or produce you grow no matter how they turn out 😀

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