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Rejuvenate your soil

Rejuvenate your soil

After a busy summer feeding edibles or flowers, garden soil needs a recharge.
How to grow peanuts

How to grow peanuts

Grow the nut that grows underground.

Past Articles

The joys of mulch

The joys of mulch

Rather than toss it, consider whether your kitchen or garden waste can do you a favour.
How to grow fennel

How to grow fennel

Light and fluffy-headed but with a crisp base, Florence fennel is a versatile vegetable to grow.
8 monsteras to grow

8 monsteras to grow

If you love Monstera deliciosa, it might be time to discover some of its many relatives, cultivars and varieties.
How to grow kohlrabi

How to grow kohlrabi

A cabbage relative is on the comeback trail. Learn how to grow kohlrabi.

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Kiwi Gardener

Kiwi Gardener

"The magazine for gardeners who like to get their hands dirty!"
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A gooseberry bush will set you back $20–25, but did you know they grow very easily from cuttings – starting to fruit after a couple of years. Bushes get better and better, especially if each bush is given a mulch of organic material and a handful of potash in autumn or spring. Flowers appear late September or early October and 8–12 weeks later, the fruit is ready to pick.

Rich soil that is not allowed to dry out in summer or become a bog in winter is ideal for gooseberries. Grow them 2m apart in full sun or part shade. If space is limited, espalier the bushes against a fence, or train them on a couple of wires at the edge of a vegetable bed. They also work well as standards.

Gooseberries fruit on the stems they grew the previous summer. Some writers 
recommend winter pruning, presumably because it’s easier to see what you’re 
doing when the leaves fall. Our expert contributor Gillian Vine  sticks to the time-honoured Kiwi method of pruning as she picks, letting the new growth come through, then doing a little tidying up over winter. 

#gooseberriesnz
#kiwigardenermagazine

A gooseberry bush will set you back $20–25, but did you know they grow very easily from cuttings – starting to fruit after a couple of years. Bushes get better and better, especially if each bush is given a mulch of organic material and a handful of potash in autumn or spring. Flowers appear late September or early October and 8–12 weeks later, the fruit is ready to pick.

Rich soil that is not allowed to dry out in summer or become a bog in winter is ideal for gooseberries. Grow them 2m apart in full sun or part shade. If space is limited, espalier the bushes against a fence, or train them on a couple of wires at the edge of a vegetable bed. They also work well as standards.

Gooseberries fruit on the stems they grew the previous summer. Some writers
recommend winter pruning, presumably because it’s easier to see what you’re
doing when the leaves fall. Our expert contributor Gillian Vine sticks to the time-honoured Kiwi method of pruning as she picks, letting the new growth come through, then doing a little tidying up over winter.

#gooseberriesnz
#kiwigardenermagazine
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When is the nest time to transplant Gooseberries? We are in Southland

We grew the most delicious Cape Gooseberries this year. So good

Mine died :(

Whats your favourite flutterer? The common copper or perhaps newly crowned Bug of the Year, kahukura, the NZ red admiral?Image attachment

What's your favourite flutterer? The common copper or perhaps newly crowned Bug of the Year, kahukura, the NZ red admiral? ... See MoreSee Less

Inspiration for our garden beds might come from a page in a magazine, maybe from a visit to a friends. Jane, now 50,, was inspired to create this special place to sit in her Horowhenua garden by a childhood memory of a yellow banksia rose in its full blown glory. 

We show you how to get Janes look, plant-by-plant, in our latest Design Inspiration feature: Every issue we present a garden bed thats taken our eye, number the features and plants and id the plants used. Here 1 is Rosa banksiae Lutea, 2 is an oversized apple box, 3 is Nasturtium, 5 is Salvia rosmarinus Tuscan Blue and 6 is Laurus nobilis. (4 is Dwarf stock in the lower left corner, number cropped out) 

Its just like painting by numbers (speaking of childhood memories!) 

If you have a suggestion for us of a favourite spot or planting combo, please send a DM

Inspiration for our garden beds might come from a page in a magazine, maybe from a visit to a friend's. Jane, now 50,, was inspired to create this special place to sit in her Horowhenua garden by a childhood memory of a yellow banksia rose in its full blown glory.

We show you how to get Jane's look, plant-by-plant, in our latest Design Inspiration feature: Every issue we present a garden bed that's taken our eye, number the features and plants and id the plants used. Here 1 is Rosa banksiae 'Lutea', 2 is an oversized apple box, 3 is Nasturtium, 5 is Salvia rosmarinus 'Tuscan Blue' and 6 is Laurus nobilis. (4 is Dwarf stock in the lower left corner, number cropped out)

It's just like painting by numbers (speaking of childhood memories!)

If you have a suggestion for us of a favourite spot or planting combo, please send a DM
... See MoreSee Less

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